Last edited by Jugor
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

4 edition of Ovid and the Fasti found in the catalog.

Ovid and the Fasti

an historical study

by Geraldine Herbert-Brown

  • 57 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press in Oxford [England], New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Rome,
  • Rome.
    • Subjects:
    • Ovid, 43 B.C.-17 or 18 A.D.,
    • Didactic poetry, Latin -- History and criticism.,
    • Fasts and feasts in literature.,
    • Rites and ceremonies -- Rome.,
    • Festivals -- Rome.,
    • Calendar -- Rome.,
    • Rome -- History -- Augustus, 30 B.C.-14 A.D. -- Historiography.,
    • Rome -- Religious life and customs.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [234]-242) and indexes.

      StatementGeraldine Herbert-Brown.
      SeriesOxford classical monographs
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPA6519.F9 H47 1994
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 249 p. ;
      Number of Pages249
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1405919M
      ISBN 100198149352
      LC Control Number93014179

      This commentary provides a detailed analysis of the first book of Ovid's "Fasti," a complex poem which takes as its central framework the Roman calendar in the late Augustan/early Tiberian period and purports to deal with its religious festivals and their origins. Book 1 covers the month of January, and has proven to be particularly challenging to readers in light of the apparent revision Reviews: 1.   CUP () p/b pp £ (ISBN ) Fasti 3 covers March and, of course, the Ides of 44 BC. The assassination of Julius Caesar, however is overshadowed by the well known description of the festival of Anna Perenna, also on March 15th. Ovid with his usual teasing wit tells us in line that he [ ].

      Ovid's exile did not stop him from writing poetry. The Tristia was written between 9 and 12 CE and is made up of five books, totaling over lines of elegiac couplets. The first book was written on the way to Tomi. The second book is nearly lines long, a single pleading elegy written in the poet's own defense, addressed to Emperor Augustus. P. OVIDI NASONIS FASTORVM LIBER QVINTVS Quaeritis unde putem Maio data nomina mensi? non satis est liquido cognita causa mihi. ut stat et incertus qua sit sibi nescit eundum.

        This commentary provides a detailed analysis of the first book of Ovid's Fasti, a complex poem which takes as its central framework the Roman calendar in the late Augustan/early Tiberian period and purports to deal with its religious festivals and their 1 covers the month of January, and has proven to be particularly challenging to readers in light of the apparent revision Cited by: Fasti, III Book III. Come, warlike Mars a; lay down thy shield and spear for a brief space, and from thy helmet loose thy glistering locks. Haply thou mayest ask, What has a poet to do with Mars? From thee the month which now I sing doth take its name. Thyself dost see that fierce wars are waged by .


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Ovid and the Fasti by Geraldine Herbert-Brown Download PDF EPUB FB2

Book II: Introduction. January is done, and the year advances with my song. As the second month runs, so let the second book.

For the first time, my verses, sail with more canvas, Your theme, I recall, has been slight till now. I found you ready enough servants of love, When I toyed with poetry in my first youth.

Classical Texts Library >> Ovid, Fasti >> Book 5 OVID, FASTI 5. FASTI CONTENTS. BOOK 1. January. BOOK 2. February. BOOK 3. March. BOOK 4. April. BOOK 5. May.

BOOK 6. June. FASTI BOOK 5, TRANSLATED BY JAMES G. FRAZER [1] You ask whence I suppose the name of the month of May to be derived.

The reason is not quite clearly known to me. As a. OVID was a Latin poet who flourished in Rome in the late C1st B.C. and early Ovid and the Fasti book A.D., during the reign of the Emperor Augustus.

His works include the Fasti, an incomplete poem in six books describing the first six months of the Roman calendar, richly illustrated with Greco-Roman myths and two other myth-themed works were the Metamorphoses and the Heroides. Translator’s Note: Ovid’s numerous references throughout the Fasti to the rising and setting of stars and constellations, further detailed in the relevant index entries, have been checked using a computer-based astronomical program (Redshift 4) set to Rome in 8AD.

This is a review of the kindle edition of Ovid's Fasti, which I encountered when looking for the translation by Tony Boyle published by Penguin classics. I paid £ for it, but it turned out to be a scan of a nineteenth century school text, not only in Latin, but also bowdlerised for school boys.3/5(15).

Written after he had been banished to the Black Sea city of Tomis by Emperor Augustus, the Fasti is Ovid's last major poetic work. Both a calendar of daily rituals and a witty sequence of stories recounted in a variety of styles, it weaves together tales of gods and citizens together to explore Rome's history, religious beliefs and traditions.

Written during his banishment, Fasti is a collection of six books written on the Roman calendar. From an historical perspective, the book is an excellent source of material describing Roman religious practices and mythology.

There are also a number of interesting juxtapositions in which Ovid sought to direct criticism at those who had banished him/5. The Fasti is Ovid's least readable work: anyone looking for readability will go to the love poetry or the Metamorphoses or (my favourite) the Heroides Heroides (Penguin Classics).

This translation has tried to get the exact meaning across so where the original text has (I/5(3). An Outline of Ovid’s Fasti, Books Book 1 Introduction (lines ) dedication to Germanicus Caesar Romulus’ organization of the calendar January 1 (lines ) Janus’ day origins and functions description of early Rome January 3 (lines ) the.

In Fasti, Ovid (43 BCE CE) sets forth explanations of the festivals and sacred rites that were noted on the Roman calendar, and relates in graphic detail the legends attached to specific dates. The poem is an invaluable source of information about religious practices.

This slim, elegant volume constitutes a most welcome addition to the well known series of Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics. Detailed, well referenced, and meticuluosly edited, this volume will make the teaching and study of Book 3 of Ovid’s Fasti a pleasure for colleagues and their students.

Vast erudition and considered judgement undergird what will be the standard textbook for many years Author: Richard Westall. OVIDIVS NASO (43 B.C. – 17 A.D.) METAMORPHOSES. Liber I: Liber II: Liber III: Liber IV: Liber V: Liber VI: Liber VII: Liber VIII: Liber IX.

Ovid's main surviving works are the Metamorphoses, a source of inspiration to artists and poets including Chaucer and Shakespeare; the Fasti, a poetic treatment of the Roman year of which Ovid finished only half; the Amores, love poems; the Ars Amatoria, not moral but clever and in parts beautiful; Heroides, fictitious love letters by legendary.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike United States License. An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

In exile, Ovid wrote two poetry collections, Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto, that illustrated his sadness and far from Rome, he had no access to libraries, and thus might have been forced to abandon his Fasti, a poem about the Roman calendar, of which only the first six books exist – January through June.

The five books of the elegiac Tristia, a series of poems expressing Born: Publius Ovidius Naso, 20 March 43 BC. About Fasti. Written after he had been banished to the Black Sea city of Tomis by Emperor Augustus, the Fasti is Ovid’s last major poetic work. Both a calendar of daily rituals and a witty sequence of stories recounted in a variety of styles, it weaves together tales of gods and citizens together to explore Rome’s history, religious beliefs and traditions.

Ovid is now firmly established as a central figure in the Latin poetic canon, and his Fasti is his most complex elegy. Drafted alongside the Metamorphoses before the poet's exile, it was only published after the death of Augustus, and involves a wide range of myth, Roman history, religion, astronomy and explication of the calendar.

The World of Ovid's Fasti Greece in Ovid's Fasti Italy and Sicily Ovid's Fasti Ovid's Rome: Major Sites and Monuments. Introduction Further Reading Translation and Latin Text Summary of Fasti Omissions from Fasti. Ovid's Fasti Book 1 Book 2 Book 3 Book 4 Book 5 Book 6.

Notes List of Abbreviations GlossaryPages: P. Ovidius Naso. Ovid's Fasti. Sir James George Frazer. London; Cambridge, MA. William Heinemann Ltd.; Harvard University Press.

Keyboarding. Book IV of the Fasti, Ovid's celebration of the Roman calendar and its associated legends, is the book of April and honours the festivals of Venus, Cybele, Ceres, and their cult, as well as the traditional date of the foundation of Rome and many religious and civic by:.

Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Ovid's main surviving works are the Metamorphoses, a source of inspiration to artists and poets including Chaucer and Shakespeare; the Fasti, a poetic treatment of the Roman year of which Ovid finished only half; the Amores, love poems; the Ars Amatoria, not moral but clever and in parts beautiful; Heroides, fictitious love letters by legendary Brand: Harvard.Full text of "A translation of Ovid's Fasti into English prose." See other formats.